linux

linux

Find Architecture And Version Of A Linux Box

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 23:20

When doing an audit of an existing Linux server a good first step is to find out what distribution is running and if the server is running a 32 or 64 bit architecture.

To find out what architecture a server is running you can run the uname command, which will print out certain system information. This must be supplied with the -a flag in order to print out as much information as possible. uname -a

This will print out a line similar to the following on an Ubuntu system.

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Print A Specific Block Of Lines From A File In Linux

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 - 21:08

If you have a large file of data that you are trying to import, or a log file you are trying to dissect then you'll rarely want to print it directly out to the screen. Using commands like more or programs like vim can make things a little easier but you still have to run through potentially thousands of lines to find the correct block.

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Automatically List Directory Contents When Changing Directory In Linux

Tuesday, January 28, 2014 - 23:56

When navigating around a Linux box I tend to find I use the same two commands a lot. The first is 'cd' to change a directory, and the second is 'ls' in order to see what is in the new directory. Rather than do this over and over again I decided to look around for a good solution to automate this.

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Copying Files With Secure Copy

Saturday, June 15, 2013 - 19:52

The secure copy command (run using scp) is a Linux command that allows the transfer of files between two computers. This can be locally to a remote server, from a remote server to a local location, or even between two remote servers.

When copying to or from a remote host scp uses ssh for the data transfer. This means that authentication is required, but the files are copied in a secure fashion. When starting a scp request the command first sets up an ssh connection to the remote location, which is then used for the rest of the transfer.

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Uzing Tar To Compress And Uncompress Files

Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 22:13

The tar command can be used to compress or extract one or more files in Linux. A tar file isn't actually a compressed format, instead it is a collection of files within a single file. The tar command can take one or more files, convert them into a tar file and then compress it into a gzip file format. The file created will have the extension tar.gz.

There are a large number of flags that can be used but the main ones for everyday use are.

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SSH Bad Owner Or Permissions Error

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 23:29

After a recent update on Ubuntu I found that I was unable to use ssh due to a strange permissions error to do with the ssh config file. This was quite a problem as I wasn't able to push changes to my git server. The error was as follows:

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