Pretty Print JSON With Python

Tuesday, December 23, 2014 - 14:56

JSON is a very common data format, but reading it can be a little difficult, especially if the JSON contains very little white space. If you have Python 2.6 or above you have use the json.tool to format the JSON so that you can read it correctly. This is also a good way to validate JSON strings that you have had to hand edit before they cause errors upstream.

If you have a file called file.json, which contains a bunch of JSON output, you can use Python to format this into a readable structure in the following way.

Category: 

PHPNW14: A Review

Saturday, November 8, 2014 - 00:08

The annual PHPNW conference, now in it’s 7th year, was held on the 4th and 5th of October in Manchester, again in the Mancester Conference Centre. The conference was attended by over 400 people with over 30 speakers from all over the world who talked about everything from project management to the internals of PHP. I have been volunteering at PHPNW for a few years now, but this year I was able to attend as a delegate with a number of colleagues from Access. It’s been a few weeks since the event, but I haven’t had a chance to publish this review, so here it is.

Category: 

Find Architecture And Version Of A Linux Box

Tuesday, August 12, 2014 - 23:20

When doing an audit of an existing Linux server a good first step is to find out what distribution is running and if the server is running a 32 or 64 bit architecture.

To find out what architecture a server is running you can run the uname command, which will print out certain system information. This must be supplied with the -a flag in order to print out as much information as possible. uname -a

This will print out a line similar to the following on an Ubuntu system.

Category: 

Speeding Up Apache And Drupal With Varnish

Sunday, June 8, 2014 - 20:37

Varnish is a web application accelerator that provides an easy speed increase to most web applications and Drupal is no exception. It works by creating a reverse proxy service that sits in front of your web server and caches traffic that comes through it. When the page is requested, Varnish forwards the request to the web server to complete the request, the response that comes back from the web server is then cached by Varnish. This means that the next request to the same page is served by Varnish and not the web server, which results in a large speed increase.

Category: 

Print A Specific Block Of Lines From A File In Linux

Tuesday, May 20, 2014 - 21:08

If you have a large file of data that you are trying to import, or a log file you are trying to dissect then you'll rarely want to print it directly out to the screen. Using commands like more or programs like vim can make things a little easier but you still have to run through potentially thousands of lines to find the correct block.

Category: